SAS Date Functions:- DATEPART( ), TIMEPART( ), Hour(), Minute(), Second() Part1

by | May 11, 2024 | SAS | 0 comments


In SAS, the DATEPART() and TIMEPART() functions are used to extract the date and time parts from datetime values, respectively. Here’s how each function works:

1. DATEPART():

The DATEPART() function extracts the date part from a datetime value and returns it as a date value. This function is particularly useful when you have datetime values and need to perform date-specific operations without considering the time component.

Syntax:

DATEPART(datetime)

Example: Suppose you have a datetime variable datetime_var containing the value ’01Jan2022:12:30:45′, and you want to extract the date part from it. You can use the DATEPART() function as follows:

data output;
set input;
date_only = DATEPART(datetime_var);
run;

In this example, date_only will contain the date part ’01Jan2022′.

2. TIMEPART():

The TIMEPART() function extracts the time part from a datetime value and returns it as a time value. Similarly to DATEPART(), this function is useful when you need to perform time-specific operations without considering the date component.

Syntax:

TIMEPART(datetime)

Example: Suppose you have the same datetime variable datetime_var containing the value ’01Jan2022:12:30:45′, and you want to extract the time part from it. You can use the TIMEPART() function as follows:

data output;
set input;
time_only = TIMEPART(datetime_var);
run;

In this example, time_only will contain the time part ’12:30:45′.

3. HOUR():

The HOUR() function extracts the hour component from a datetime value and returns it as an integer value representing the hour of the day (0-23).

Syntax:

HOUR(datetime)

Example:

data output;
set input;
hour_of_day = HOUR(datetime_var);
run;

4. MINUTE():

The MINUTE() function extracts the minute component from a datetime value and returns it as an integer value representing the minute of the hour (0-59).

Syntax:

MINUTE(datetime)

Example:

data output;
set input;
minute_of_hour = MINUTE(datetime_var);
run;

5. SECOND():

The SECOND() function extracts the second component from a datetime value and returns it as an integer value representing the second of the minute (0-59).

Syntax:

SECOND(datetime)

Example:

data output;
set input;
second_of_minute = SECOND(datetime_var);
run;

Additional Notes:

  • Both DATEPART() and TIMEPART() functions are part of Base SAS.
  • These functions are handy when dealing with datetime values in SAS, allowing you to perform specific operations on either the date or time component separately.
  • The output of DATEPART() is a SAS date value, while the output of TIMEPART() is a SAS time value.
  • You can use the extracted date or time values for various purposes such as filtering, grouping, or calculations in your SAS programs.

Written by HintsToday Team

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